Research

UTMB develops an oral vaccine against Salmonella


Barrows1700
By Donna Ramirez | December 15, 2016

Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have developed a vaccine against salmonella poisoning designed to be taken by mouth. The findings are detailed in an article published in Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology.

In earlier studies, the UTMB researchers developed potential vaccines from three genetically mutated versions of the salmonella bacteria, that is Salmonella Typhimurium, that were shown to protect mice against a lethal dose of salmonella. In these studies, the vaccines were given as an injection.

However, oral vaccination is simplest and least invasive way to protect people against salmonella infection. Taking this vaccine by mouth also has the added advantage of using the same pathway that salmonella uses to wreak havoc on the digestive system.

“In the current study, we analyzed the immune responses of mice that received the vaccination by mouth as well as how they responded to a lethal dose of salmonella, said Ashok Chopra, UTMB professor of microbiology and immunology. “We found that the orally administered vaccines produced strong immunity against salmonella, showing their potential for future use in people.”

There is no vaccine currently available for salmonella poisoning. Antibiotics are the first choice in treating salmonella infections, but the fact that some strains of salmonella are quickly developing antibiotic resistance is a serious concern. Another dangerous aspect of salmonella is that it can be used as a bioweapon – this happened in Oregon when a religious cult intentionally contaminated restaurant salad bars and sickened 1,000 people.

Salmonella is responsible for one of the most common food-borne illnesses in the world. In the US alone, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that there are about 1.4 million cases with 15,000 hospitalizations and 400 deaths each year. It is thought that for every reported case, there are approximately 39 undiagnosed infections. Overall, the number of salmonella cases in the US has not changed since 1996.

Salmonella infection in people with compromised immune systems and children under the age of three are at increased risk of invasive non-typhoidal salmonellosis, which causes systemic infection. There are about one million cases globally per year, with a 25 percent fatality rate.

Other authors include UTMB’s Tatiana Erova, Michelle Kirtley, Eric Fitts, Duraisamy Ponnusamy, Jourdan Andersson, Yingzi Cong, Bethany Tiner and Jian Sha as well as Wallace Baze from the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. The study was supported by UTMB and The National Institutes of Health.

Tags | Research



Social Posts

profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

Baylor College of Medicine will be closed Monday, May 28 in observance of Memorial Day. https://t.co/6CNQMhyJ92

2 hours ago
profile_image

Baylor College of Medicine

BaylorCollegeOfMedicine

Baylor College of Medicine will be closed Monday, May 28 in observance of Memorial Day.

2 hours ago
profile_image

TAMU Health Sciences

@TAMHSC

#TAMHSC researchers are working to solve #diabetes-related blindness: https://t.co/D1Pi8CaD0H #Health

2 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

#Melanoma survivor explains how #immunotherapy #clinicaltrial and @DrSapnaPatel gave her hope. #CancerMoonShot #endcancer https://t.co/gxr9MaYsHi

2 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

MDAnderson

Leticia Rousseve found comfort whenever she verbalized her frustrations and feelings to others who understood what she was going through as a caregiver for her husband, James, during his soft tissue sarcoma treatment. “This taught me an important lesson that I now share with others going through cancer: you are not alone.” Now, she pays it forward by volunteering with myCancerConnection, MD Anderson’s one-on-one cancer support community of patients, survivors and caregivers who have been there. #endcancer

3 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

At sprawling VA hospital in southern Dallas, a righteous battle to keep the promise to care for America's Veterans https://t.co/yBX7Jqyn6X via @dallasnews

3 hours ago
profile_image

Houston Methodist

@MethodistHosp

6.1, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.: Join @MethodistHosp Cancer Center at St. John for a celebration and luncheon as we honor those living with a history of cancer. Register today: https://t.co/epZbgu9fA0 https://t.co/FLv19JSQs0

3 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

Today’s #VeteranOfTheDay is @USArmy Veteran M. Ross Kirk. https://t.co/Z1oqPWmWig

3 hours ago
profile_image

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

VeteransAffairs

Today’s #VeteranOfTheDay is Army Veteran M. Ross Kirk. Ross served for 28 years and retired in 1988. He attained the rank of lieutenant colonel. Ross served two tours in Vietnam with the 4/39th Infantry Battalion, the 9th Infantry Division and the 5th Special Forces Group with the Chaplain Corps. He was also a member of the 101st Airborne Division, the 18th Airborne Corps 1st Division, and the Green Beret Parachute Demonstration Team. He wore the Green Beret on active duty for nine years and is nicknamed the “Leapin’ Deacon” due to his 225 military jumps, including 50 HALO (high altitude, low opening) jumps and 450 sport parachute jumps. Ross’ positions in the Army included Command Chaplain for the Special Operations Command (Airborne) and Senior Chaplain of the Combined Peacekeeping Forces in the liberation of Grenada. He retired at Fort Riley, Kansas in 1988 and has lived with his wife Judy in Wakefield, Kansas for 27 years. They have four children, eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Ross was awarded four Bronze Stars, five Air Medals, the Meritorious Service Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, the Joint Service Commendation Medal, the Army Commendation Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, the Army Achievement Medal and the Good Conduct Medal. He also earned the Ranger Tab, the Special Forces Tab and Master Parachutist and Air Assault Badges. Thank you for your service, Ross!

3 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

New @USDOT program provides free pilot training for Veterans https://t.co/z6mIJVPMlU via @Militarydotcom

4 hours ago
profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

New research funded by Department of Defense grants will look into why some women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer develop resistance to endocrine therapies. https://t.co/TMhNyXWZ8Y

5 hours ago
profile_image

Baylor College of Medicine

BaylorCollegeOfMedicine

Congratulations to M.D/Ph.D. student Muhammad Saad Shamim on becoming a 2018 fellow of the Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans program.

5 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

#Chemobrain is real. Learn more about this common #cancer treatment side effect: https://t.co/86Kcj2AzFy #endcancer https://t.co/iH7IP2dIUv

5 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

What you need to know about #prostatecancer screening: https://t.co/Sbt5pA5B0J @oncolognews #endcancer

7 hours ago
profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

Dr. Elizabeth McIngvale talks about her journey with obsessive compulsive disorder. https://t.co/SxpIBc1gyA #MentalHealthAwarenessMonth

9 hours ago