Press Releases

Women with single dose of HPV vaccine gain similar protection as multiple doses


SINGLE+DOSE+HPV+STUDY+AUTHORS+WEB Study authors Ashish Deshmukh, PhD, MPH; and Kalyani Sonawane, PhD. (Photo by Maricruz Kwon/UTHealth)
By uthealthhouston | January 6, 2020

A new study revealed that one dose of the HPV vaccine may prevent infection from the potential cancer-causing virus, according to research published in JAMA Network Open from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), 34,800 new cancer diagnoses are linked to human papillomavirus (HPV) annually. The virus is thought to account for more than 90% of all cervical and anal cancers, more than 60% of all penile cancers, and approximately 70% of all oral cancers.

While results of the paper showed that a single dose may be as effective as the currently recommended two- or three-dose series, it’s too early for people to rely on a single dose of the vaccine for protection, according to senior author Ashish A. Deshmukh, PhD, MPH, an assistant professor at UTHealth School of Public Health.

“HPV vaccine coverage is less than 10% globally because of poor vaccine uptake rates in many resource-limited countries. Ensuring boys and girls receive their first dose is a big challenge in several countries and a majority of adolescents are not able to complete the recommended series due to a lack of intensive infrastructure needed to administer two or three doses,” Deshmukh said. “If ongoing clinical trials provide evidence regarding sustained benefits of a one-dose regimen, then implications of single-dose strategy could be substantial for reducing the burden of these cancers globally.”

Although the study participants included only women, the CDC recommends a two-dose regimen for all children starting the series before age 15 or a three-dose regimen if the series is started between ages 16 to 26. The latest generation of HPV vaccine can protect against nearly 90% of cancer-causing HPV infections. Yet, current vaccinations rates are less than ideal – half of people in the U.S. are not vaccinated against this common sexually transmitted infection.

“The current HPV vaccine dosing regimen can be cumbersome for people to understand. If one dose is proven effective in trials, the vaccine regimen will be simplified. This will help improve the coverage rate among adolescents that are currently below the Healthy People 2020 goal and possibly will also increase the momentum of uptake in the newly approved age group,” said lead author Kalyani Sonawane, PhD, who is an assistant professor at UTHealth School of Public Health.

Michael D. Swartz, PhD, of UTHealth co-authored the study, along with Alan G. Nyitray, PhD, of the Medical College of Wisconsin; and Gizem S. Nemutlu, PhD, and Jagpreet Chhatwal, PhD, from Harvard Medical School.

Research was supported by the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health (R01CA232888). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.




Social Posts

profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

@Marissa_lara14 We're thinking of you, Marissa.

26 mins ago
profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

RT @jmills1955: Annual Surgical Jeopardy ⁦@BCM_Surgery⁩ Residents vs Faculty. The Faculty have never won! ⁦@DrRosengart⁩ ⁦@kmattox1⁩ ⁦@drml…

27 mins ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

Veterans ask, VA answers: Questions on electronic health record modernization. https://t.co/IkeHFZV0zn via #VAntagePoint

49 mins ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

103-year-old WWII Veteran finally gets the recognition he deserves https://t.co/shJIdq9Ju9 via @CBSEveningNews

11 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

Watch to learn how we’re enhancing the ability of patients’ own T cells to fight cancer. #endcancer https://t.co/sFMz5eExco

11 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

Today’s rising #livercancer rates have been driven by non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is linked to obesity.But our experts are working with @ScrippsHealth to study an #immunotherapy combination to treat liver cancer and save lives: https://t.co/uwAhLH51uk #endcancer

12 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

College of Charleston looks to send dozens of Valentine’s Day cards to Veterans https://t.co/fFqeaN3T7o via @ABCNews4

13 hours ago
profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

Dorit Donoviel, Ph.D., discusses taking risks in science and what the Translational Research Institute for Space Health is doing to help people in space with @InnoMapHou. https://t.co/wbML42L9Wb #space #spacemedicine

13 hours ago
profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

RT @bcm_ocd: Check out this chapter by our researchers in new book Exposure Therapy for Children with Anxiety and OCD. "Efficacy of exposur…

15 hours ago
profile_image

University of Houston

@UHouston

RT @UH_Pharmacy: Breaking: With 100% chance of rain for Wed, Jan. 22, the "Shine A Light on Mental Health" fair from noon to 2 pm has been…

16 hours ago
profile_image

Texas Children's

@TexasChildrens

For the second consecutive year, Transplant Services at @TexasChildrens was named the top pediatric transplant center in the US, performing a remarkable 106 solid organ transplants in 2019. Learn more: https://t.co/iR6xO02dTC https://t.co/aOPfISdYhs

17 hours ago
profile_image

University of Houston

@UHouston

Which Shasta are YOU? Check out our new Instagram face effects, available now! https://t.co/POQlqNnN3W

18 hours ago
profile_image

Texas Children's

@TexasChildrens

Join us this Saturday, January 25 for All About HER! (Health, Emotions & Relationships) at @TexasChildrens The Woodlands! To register, visit: https://t.co/7dqWlmWZOg https://t.co/J84AYU8aZW

18 hours ago
profile_image

Texas Children's

@TexasChildrens

Feeling the love on #NationalHugDay 🤗 #AstrosCaravan @OrbitAstros @astros https://t.co/fqD7iWP7AH

19 hours ago
profile_image

TexasHeartInstitute

@Texas_Heart

Belly fat, more than excess weight, may be a factor in the risk for multiple heart attacks, according to a new study. Tackle that belly fat with a heart-healthy diet and exercise. https://t.co/8f3YKQOlPJ via @CNN https://t.co/bDi6EYVVHZ

20 hours ago