3:05 p.m.: O.H. “Bud” Frazier, M.D., talks to a group of students, interns, residents, fellows, nurse practitioners and physician assistants at Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center.
3:11 p.m.: In the cardiovascular and thoracic surgery unit of Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center, Frazier is briefed on the patient’s status, learning that her first pump was implanted in 2013. Doctors said the patient had arrived in early January not feeling well, so they replaced the pump.
3:26 p.m.: Frazier demonstrates the way blood is moved in and out of the heart when LVADs are implanted.
3:43 p.m.: Frazier reviews CT scan images to pinpoint why the patient's heart pump failed.
3:50 p.m.: Frazier visits with the patient to assess how well the new implanted LVAD is working.
Clinical

LVAD innovator O.H. ‘Bud’ Frazier Begins Bedside Teaching Rounds

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LVAD innovator O.H. ‘Bud’ Frazier Begins Bedside Teaching Rounds

O.H. “Bud” Frazier, M.D., visited the cardiovascular and thoracic surgery unit of Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center this week to greet medical professionals who were eager to learn from the man who is globally recognized as the leader in the development of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs).

LVADs are the most widely used heart pump. It is estimated that 30,000 of these devices have been implanted in patients with failing hearts around the world over the past 10 years. These life-saving electromechanical pumps, also called mechanical circulatory support devices, are the brainchild of a handful of pioneering heart surgeons from the Texas Medical Center, including Frazier.

In November 2016, Frazier, chief of transplant services at Baylor St. Luke’s, professor of surgery at Baylor College of Medicine and chief of the Center for Cardiac Support at the Texas Heart Institute, launched monthly, one-hour bedside teaching rounds on LVADs for students, interns, residents, fellows, nurse practitioners and physician assistants.

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