Cardiology

8th Annual Women’s Heart & Vascular Symposium


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Saturday, January 20, 2018 | 7:30 AM - 5:30 PM Add to Calendar

Cardiovascular disease and stroke impact women differently across race and ethnicity while cultural, educational and economic disparities further complicate prevention efforts like screening and risk factor management, diagnosis and treatment selection and patient compliance or cooperation. Hispanic women are likely to develop heart disease 10 years earlier than Caucasian women.

Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death for Hispanic women, killing nearly 21,000 annually. Only 34% of Hispanic women know that heart disease is their greatest health risk. Hispanic women are least likely to have a usual source of health medical care and only 1 in 8 say that their doctor has ever discussed their risk for heart disease. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death for African-American women, killing over 48,000 annually.

Only 36% of African American women know that heart disease is their greatest health risk. Of African-American women ages 20 and older, 48.3% have cardiovascular disease. Yet, only 14% believe that cardiovascular disease is their greatest health problem. Only about 50% of African-American women are aware of the signs and symptoms of a heart attack.

For American Indian or Alaska Native and Asian or Pacific Islander women heart disease is second only to cancer. More women than men die of cardiovascular disease each year with 64% of these women experiencing no previous symptoms of this disease [Thom 2015].

For more information and registration, visit: http://www.texasheart.org/Education/CME/index.cfm


Location

CHI St. Luke' Health - Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center

6720 Bertner Ave, Houston, TX 77030

Contact

Stephanie Jackson, MBA

832-355-9100