Art

Curated: Looking at a flower


By Britni Riley | February 05, 2018

To better understand his surroundings and the human condition, Houston-based artist Joseph Cohen has spent several years embedded in top research labs with scientists, immersing himself in their work.

“I am working with labs in different research institutions and trying to distill the information in a way that will allow me to expand on the capability of science through the lens of art,” Cohen said.

Cohen’s latest exhibit, Looking at a flower, is on display at the BioScience Research Collaborative (BRC) at Rice University, in conjunction with Rice Public Art.

Because of the exhibit’s name, one might expect to find paintings of peonies or fields of lavender. Instead, Cohen dives deep into the microscopic intricacies of science, engineering and medicine. The three-piece exhibit in the lobby of the BRC uses molecules as a spring- board for mixed-media works. Each piece has two parts that complement one another while remaining distinct.

To create the first set in the exhibit, entitled Where do I stand?, Cohen worked with the Tour Group at Rice University using lasers, computer imaging and other raw materials. These works incorporate graphene, a form of carbon consisting of a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice, like a honeycomb.

“I worked with laser-induced graphene,” Cohen said. “In a sense, it’s kind of burning it, but not quite because it is doing it in such a way that it’s not just making carbon, it is making a very particular structure of carbon.”

The second set in the show, If he/she could see my love, is a result of time spent in the labs of R. Bruce Weisman, Ph.D., professor of chemistry, materials science and nanoengineering at Rice University, and Daniel Heller, Ph.D., head of the Daniel Heller Lab at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical College.

Heller’s team is harnessing the luminescent properties of carbon nanoparticles to help detect cancer at earlier stages and target treatment therapies for metastatic cancer tumors. Cohen’s work with carbon nanotubes—forms of carbon with a cylindrical nanostructure—follows a similar search and find mission. Under light, carbon nanotubes are naturally fluorescent; the colors they release depend upon the structure of the tubes themselves. Cohen uses them to expose light that would otherwise not be visible to the human eye.

“The material allows me to create artwork that directly addresses the near-infrared spectrum,” Cohen said.

A song for my father is the final piece in the exhibit. To develop the vocal painting on canvas, Cohen worked with Ennio Tasciotti, Ph.D., director of the Center for Musculoskeletal Regeneration at Houston Methodist, to analyze the molecular structure of various pigment samples and create “color chords.” Cohen used these color chords as the basis for a musical composition and then produced a painting based on the song, in essence allowing viewers to hear how a painting sounds and see how a song looks. Visitors to the exhibition who have headphones can listen to the song on an iPad mini.

Looking at a flower will be on display through April 8 and is located in the lobby of the BioScience Research Collaborative at Rice University, 6500 S. Main St., on the corner of University Blvd. Information: brc.rice.edu.

Tags | Art, What's New



RELATED NEWS

picture

Curated

May 02, 2018
picture

Curated

April 03, 2018
picture

Curated: BioRhythm

March 08, 2018

Social Posts

profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

Baylor College of Medicine will be closed Monday, May 28 in observance of Memorial Day. https://t.co/6CNQMhyJ92

2 hours ago
profile_image

Baylor College of Medicine

BaylorCollegeOfMedicine

Baylor College of Medicine will be closed Monday, May 28 in observance of Memorial Day.

2 hours ago
profile_image

TAMU Health Sciences

@TAMHSC

#TAMHSC researchers are working to solve #diabetes-related blindness: https://t.co/D1Pi8CaD0H #Health

2 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

#Melanoma survivor explains how #immunotherapy #clinicaltrial and @DrSapnaPatel gave her hope. #CancerMoonShot #endcancer https://t.co/gxr9MaYsHi

2 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

MDAnderson

Leticia Rousseve found comfort whenever she verbalized her frustrations and feelings to others who understood what she was going through as a caregiver for her husband, James, during his soft tissue sarcoma treatment. “This taught me an important lesson that I now share with others going through cancer: you are not alone.” Now, she pays it forward by volunteering with myCancerConnection, MD Anderson’s one-on-one cancer support community of patients, survivors and caregivers who have been there. #endcancer

3 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

At sprawling VA hospital in southern Dallas, a righteous battle to keep the promise to care for America's Veterans https://t.co/yBX7Jqyn6X via @dallasnews

3 hours ago
profile_image

Houston Methodist

@MethodistHosp

6.1, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.: Join @MethodistHosp Cancer Center at St. John for a celebration and luncheon as we honor those living with a history of cancer. Register today: https://t.co/epZbgu9fA0 https://t.co/FLv19JSQs0

3 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

Today’s #VeteranOfTheDay is @USArmy Veteran M. Ross Kirk. https://t.co/Z1oqPWmWig

3 hours ago
profile_image

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

VeteransAffairs

Today’s #VeteranOfTheDay is Army Veteran M. Ross Kirk. Ross served for 28 years and retired in 1988. He attained the rank of lieutenant colonel. Ross served two tours in Vietnam with the 4/39th Infantry Battalion, the 9th Infantry Division and the 5th Special Forces Group with the Chaplain Corps. He was also a member of the 101st Airborne Division, the 18th Airborne Corps 1st Division, and the Green Beret Parachute Demonstration Team. He wore the Green Beret on active duty for nine years and is nicknamed the “Leapin’ Deacon” due to his 225 military jumps, including 50 HALO (high altitude, low opening) jumps and 450 sport parachute jumps. Ross’ positions in the Army included Command Chaplain for the Special Operations Command (Airborne) and Senior Chaplain of the Combined Peacekeeping Forces in the liberation of Grenada. He retired at Fort Riley, Kansas in 1988 and has lived with his wife Judy in Wakefield, Kansas for 27 years. They have four children, eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Ross was awarded four Bronze Stars, five Air Medals, the Meritorious Service Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, the Joint Service Commendation Medal, the Army Commendation Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, the Army Achievement Medal and the Good Conduct Medal. He also earned the Ranger Tab, the Special Forces Tab and Master Parachutist and Air Assault Badges. Thank you for your service, Ross!

3 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

New @USDOT program provides free pilot training for Veterans https://t.co/z6mIJVPMlU via @Militarydotcom

4 hours ago
profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

New research funded by Department of Defense grants will look into why some women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer develop resistance to endocrine therapies. https://t.co/TMhNyXWZ8Y

5 hours ago
profile_image

Baylor College of Medicine

BaylorCollegeOfMedicine

Congratulations to M.D/Ph.D. student Muhammad Saad Shamim on becoming a 2018 fellow of the Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans program.

5 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

#Chemobrain is real. Learn more about this common #cancer treatment side effect: https://t.co/86Kcj2AzFy #endcancer https://t.co/iH7IP2dIUv

5 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

What you need to know about #prostatecancer screening: https://t.co/Sbt5pA5B0J @oncolognews #endcancer

7 hours ago
profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

Dr. Elizabeth McIngvale talks about her journey with obsessive compulsive disorder. https://t.co/SxpIBc1gyA #MentalHealthAwarenessMonth

9 hours ago