Research

THI Research Indicates New Blood Pressure Guidelines Greatly Impact Women in the Houston Area

The percentage of women with high blood pressure in the Greater Houston community could more than double


Texas-Heart-Instiute_Dr.Stephanie-Coulter
By Texas Medical Center | November 21, 2017

Last week new guidelines were released that redefine hypertension (high blood pressure), which is a leading cause of heart failure, stroke and heart disease. According to the American Heart Association, the change means 46 percent of U.S. adults will now be identified as having high blood pressure. In the Houston area – which is home to the Texas Heart Institute – the percentage of women with hypertension could be even higher based on research conducted by the Institute’s Center for Women’s Heart & Vascular Health.

According to the Women’s Center’s Houston HeartReach Registry, the percentage of women with high blood pressure in the Greater Houston community could more than double based on new guidelines released by the American Heart Association, the American College of Cardiology and nine other health professional organizations.

“Under the old guidelines, almost 20 percent of the women we screened through our Houston HeartReach programs had high blood pressures,” said Dr. Stephanie Coulter, Director of Texas Heart Institute’s Center for Women’s Heart & Vascular Health. “Under the new guidelines, almost 55 percent now have high blood pressure.”

High blood pressure used to be considered 140/90, but now, individuals with blood pressure readings of 130 mm Hg systolic pressure (top number) or 80 mm Hg diastolic pressure (bottom number) are considered to have stage 1 hypertension. In addition to this change, one of the most significant changes in the new guidelines is the removal of the category “prehypertension.”

“The newly defined ‘elevated blood pressure’ category and removal of the ‘prehypertension’ label is a really important change that I think will have a seriously positive impact on prevention,” Dr. Coulter continued. “Recent studies have shown people who achieve 120 mm Hg systolic pressure or lower have roughly 30 percent fewer heart attacks, strokes and less heart disease than those with slightly higher blood pressure target goals. That’s significant and I’m happy to see the updated guidelines now reflect these findings which I believe will help to save millions of lives.”

Dr. Coulter, who has written about the risks of high systolic pressure and her recommendations for target blood pressure rates, has long been interested in investigating the roles biology, psychology and lifestyle play in putting a woman at risk for heart disease. To investigate the racial disparity in the development of cardiovascular disease within Harris County, the Houston HeartReach database registry was established earlier this year in correlation with the Houston HeartReach community outreach program.

The Houston HeartReach outreach program is a collaborative effort joining the cardiovascular clinical and research expertise of Texas Heart Institute’s Center for Women’s Heart & Vascular Health with the community outreach organizations of the Greater Houston area. The program was launched in 2011 and is supported by grants from the Alpha Phi Foundation, Hamill Foundation and Kappa Kappa Gamma Charitable Foundation of Houston.




Social Posts

profile_image

Rice University

@RiceUniversity

The @GlasscockSchool's fall course catalog is chock-full of offerings for ever-curious learners, including classes in the humanities and sciences, foreign languages and personal and professional development. https://t.co/A793BrcLfz https://t.co/8a1K8LbHE2

27 mins ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

Last Shasta County Navy Veteran who survived Pearl Harbor attack laid to rest https://t.co/lc5ODzbk9l via @JimSchultz_RS

57 mins ago
profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

One internal medicine resident looks back at a time where a patient helped him realize the balance of overly identifying with patients and complete detachment. https://t.co/7xsFWEhVc4

57 mins ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

Santa Clarita Air Force Veteran Launches Campaign For Web Series To Depict Modern Soldier Life https://t.co/Td0ds3jxue via @KHTSRADIO

2 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

Today’s #VeteranOfTheDay is @USArmy Veteran Stanley Nelson. https://t.co/SHml8yEysj

2 hours ago
profile_image

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

VeteransAffairs

Today’s #VeteranOfTheDay is Army Veteran Stanley Nelson. Stanley served from 1949 to 1952.Stanley, from Otwell, Indiana in Pike County, joined the Army in 1949 and completed training at Fort Knox. He was sent to Japan and in 1950 was assigned to the 8th Engineer Combat Battalion, 1st Calvary in Korea during the Korean War. On February 14, 1951, Stanley was defending the flank of advancing soldiers near Chipyong in modern-day South Korea. He was wounded by small arms fire in the right shoulder, right foot, left leg and left foot. Stanley was left incapacitated and was captured by the enemy.Stanley endured torture and difficult conditions while held prisoner and was left to die. However, American forces discovered him and evacuated him for medical treatment. The lower part of Stanley’s leg was amputated the following month and he recovered at Percy James Army Hospital in Battle Creek, Michigan. He was medically retired on January 31, 1952.Thank you for your service, Stanley!

2 hours ago
profile_image

UTHealth

@UTHealth

Thank you @MBThewoodlands for supporting student scholarships at @MDA_UTHGrad! It also is hosting our next House Calls web chat on sports medicine this Thursday, July 19, at 6:30 p.m. CST at https://t.co/N5UU1Jx4pq. Submit a question for our experts by using #UTHealthHouseCalls.

3 hours ago
profile_image

UTHealth

@UTHealth

RT @abc13houston: The most common sports injuries are strains and sprains, but do you know when you might need to see a doctor? The experts…

3 hours ago
profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

RT @BCMHouston_News: Tune in to @FOX26Houston tomorrow in the 8 am hour to hear @bcmhouston's Dr. El-Serag discuss the recent CDC report on…

4 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

#Cancerpain can be related to the disease and treatment. Hear from Dr. Salahadin Abdi on how patients can find relief. #endcancer https://t.co/snFVjDUjNe

4 hours ago
profile_image

TexasHeartInstitute

@Texas_Heart

RT @HealthyWomen: 10 Sneaky Ways to Get Fruits and Veggies in Your #Diet: https://t.co/wJ9x39147k #health https://t.co/EWktCmct2J

4 hours ago
profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

RT @BCMHouston_News: Certain nail products can cause allergic reactions or irritations. @bcmhouston's Dr. Katta shares what to look out for…

4 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

@ParrotsMatter @TargetedOnc @michaelwangmd Hi, yes we are. Here's a list of current clinical trials: https://t.co/JgHpaIKBbX. Best wishes to you.

5 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

RT @MDAndersonTrial: A phase I/Ib study of concurrent intravenous and intrathecal nivolumab for patients with leptomeningeal disease (LMD)…

5 hours ago
profile_image

Rice University

@RiceUniversity

RT @RiceAthletics: To celebrate #WorldEmojiDay, check out our favorite mascot @SammyTheOwl! 🦉👐 https://t.co/ebIKcsu2Z9

5 hours ago