Innovation

TMCx Welcomes New Medical Device Class


TMCx_Group
By Christine Hall | August 07, 2017

The Texas Medical Center (TMC) Innovation Institute kicked off its four-month accelerator program this week by welcoming 19 startups from across the world to introduce their medical devices to the Houston health care market.

This is the fifth installment of TMCx, a program designed to meet the needs of startups at every stage—from ideation to commercialization—by lowering the barriers of access to hospital stakeholders and key opinion leaders in the world’s largest medical center.

Innovation Institute members sifted through 123 applications from companies headquartered in 15 countries. The companies that ultimately make up the class include seven local companies, nine from outside of Texas, and three from outside of the U.S.

In addition, one of the companies, Alleviant Medical, moves into the cohort from the TMC Biodesign program, a one-year fellowship bringing together eight people from diverse backgrounds who work together in interdisciplinary teams to observe and identify unmet needs and collaboratively create products to solve them.

Meet the new medical device class:

Aesela (Houston, TX) – Wearable photobiomodulation device designed to accelerate and enhance post-surgical recovery.

Alleviant Medical (Houston, TX) – Transcatheter technology to provide left atrial decompression and symptomatic relief for congestive heart failure.

Bitome (Boston, MA) – MRI-based diagnostic tool for non-invasive monitoring of the human hydration state.

Dock Technologies (Madison, WI) – Electronic wristbands that provide a visual reminder of time elapsed, helping care teams quickly navigate complex treatment processes.

Elsius Biomedical (Canada) – Portable Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) unit that includes a proprietary coating to enhance biocompatibility and prevent blood clots.

Forest Devices (Pittsburgh, PA) – Screening device that enables identification of stroke patients and traige to the right level of care.

GuidaBot (Houston, TX) – MRI-compatible robotic system that precisely targets areas of the brain during minimally-invasive neurosurgical procedures.

iSono Health (San Francisco, CA) – Accessible at-home breast health monitoring combining 3D ultrasound and artificial intelligence.

Multisensor Diagnostics (Baltimore, MD) – Device that measures multiple vital signs by mouth in less than a minute.

NanoEar Technologies (Houston, TX) – A minimally-invasive, micro-implantable hearing aid, positioned to disrupt the market by utilizing Direct Eardrum Modulation.

NAVi Medical Technologies (Australia) – Improving neonatal umbilical venous catheter (UVC) placements by providing clinicians with real-time feedback on the location of the catheter tip.

Orphidia (San Francisco, CA) – Portable blood diagnostic platform providing lab-quality test results in 20 minutes.

PolyVascular (Houston, TX) – Polymeric transcatheter valves for children with congenital heart disease.

Raiing Medical (Boston, MA) – Wearable device monitoring vital signs for connected health.

Replete Biotics (Houston, TX) – Standardizes fecal specimen processing while protecting bacterial community integrity and eliminating cross-contamination risks.

Resthetics (Houston, TX) – Device to convert waste anesthesia into a safe renewable resource.

Sonavex (Baltimore, MD) – Implantable device that utilizes ultrasound to detect blood clots after surgery.

Vena Medical (Canada) – Making vascular procedures faster, easier and safer by providing physicians with a thin fiberoptic camera that sees through blood.

Vitls (San Francisco, CA) – Vital signs platform for continuous, remote monitoring.

Tags | Innovation



Social Posts

profile_image

Houston Methodist

houstonmethodist

#TalkTuesday: Avocados are one of the best sources of vitamin E. They help to reduce blood pressure and lower cholesterol levels. And they’re delicious, too! Have you added this #superfood into your diet?

9 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

.@ColonCancerDoc on new #colorectalcancer surveillance study: “These findings differ from historical data and argue to reconsider current guideline recommendations, in the U.S.” https://t.co/F844eC5ya8 #CRCSM #endcancer

9 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

Playing #guitar during #braintumor surgery helps Dr. Sujit Prabhu preserve survivor Robert Alvarez’s brain function: “Everything worked like a symphony.” #BTSM #endcancer https://t.co/kELJrAzSbz

10 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

MDAnderson

“I knew I had pancreatic cancer,” Jane Mooney recalls. “But I chose not to know any other details, because the only way for me to remain optimistic was to keep my life very simple. I had to concentrate on the task at hand.” #endcancer

10 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

Why #prostatecancer survivor Andy Moriarty advocates for men to get annual physical and cancer screenings: https://t.co/IyuGHSWuw2 #CancerMoonshot #endcancer https://t.co/SKp1Tz4CDz

10 hours ago
profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

Mark your calendars now for a Geriatrics for Primary Care Providers course on June 23. Register here: https://t.co/QwSaH6KVwL https://t.co/sK8kRsRKDA

11 hours ago
profile_image

Baylor College of Medicine

BaylorCollegeOfMedicine

Bumping up your weekly exercise over as little as six years could lead to a decrease in heart failure risk.

11 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

Specialty court helps Veterans get back on track https://t.co/qYxnqZRAQE via @GainesvilleSun

11 hours ago
profile_image

UTHealth

MyUTHealth

Two-hundred and twenty-seven McGovern Medical School students marched across the stage to receive their degrees during the school's 45th commencement ceremony on May 18. Congratulations, graduates! #UTHealth18 #ManyFacesOfUTHealth

11 hours ago
profile_image

Memorial Hermann

@memorialhermann

Known for providing the highest level of care for adults & children with critical injuries, the Red Duke Trauma Institute at Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center is one of the busiest Level I trauma centers in the nation. Watch part two: https://t.co/K9PoJyjeGZ. #EMSWeek #TeamMH https://t.co/1WwG3Qh0D3

11 hours ago
profile_image

Rice University

@RiceUniversity

Researchers have synthesized and isolated plasmonic magnesium nanoparticles that show all the promise of their gold, silver and aluminum cousins with none of the drawbacks. https://t.co/vlCSeReYKN https://t.co/rYDoL5aetL

11 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

Fargo VA selected for ‘Whole Health’ initiative https://t.co/RGFuTDArDq via @inforum

12 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

Today’s #VeteranOfTheDay is @USArmy Veteran Elvis Arthur Mason. https://t.co/ij3B2SLLlk

13 hours ago
profile_image

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

VeteransAffairs

Today’s #VeteranOfTheDay is Army Veteran Elvis Arthur Mason. Arthur served from 1942 to 1946 and 1950 to 1952. Elvis was born in October 1921 in Elberfeld, Indiana. He moved to Oakland City, Indiana and was drafted into the Army at the age of 20. Elvis completed basic training at Camp Swift, Texas and was assigned to an infantry regiment. He also completed swamp training, desert training and mountain training in Louisiana, California and West Virginia, respectively. Elvis’s unit was deployed to Europe and landed in England shortly after D-Day. Elvis traveled to France and volunteered to drive gasoline to other allied camps. His unit engaged in combat for 100 consecutive days and moved through France, Germany, Luxembourg, Belgium and Holland to push the German army back. Elvis took over as platoon leader during this campaign and credited the platoon’s camaraderie for helping the soldiers get through the difficult time. Elvis briefly remained in Europe after Germany surrendered and participated in the liberation of a poorly maintained camp of German citizens. He then returned to the United States and was preparing to travel to Japan when the Japanese surrendered in 1945. Elvis continued to serve at Camp Shelby, Mississippi and Camp Butler, North Carolina before he was honorably discharged in December, 1945. He joined the Army reserves and was called to join the Korean War in 1950. He reported to Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri in October and served in Japan and Korea, where he helped to build roads and airstrips for artillery planes. Elvis was awarded the Purple Heart and a Bronze Star. He passed away on July 14, 2012 at the age of 90. We honor his service.

13 hours ago
profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

Looking for a gift for your graduate to remember his or her time at Baylor College of Medicine? Check out our team shop for shirts, hats, cups, and so much more! https://t.co/QQw2ZfLPHk https://t.co/9wxEsAZxOJ

13 hours ago