Innovation

Baylor team a finalist at international tech startup event


By Jeannette Jimenez | August 2, 2016

Two budding entrepreneurs at Baylor College of Medicine may have developed the next big advancement in cancer health care. Ravi Pathak and Hristijan Risteski, both members of Dr. Andrew Sikora’s lab in the department of otolaryngology, were among the top 10 finalists out of nearly 750 applicants presented at OneStart, the world’s largest life sciences and health care startup accelerator competition.

OneStart is a worldwide health care startup program where individuals looking to improve human health care with new innovative research tools, software, devices and diagnostics can apply to receive $150,000 to start their company.

Their budding start-up, Ovodex, seeks to commercialize a novel personalized medicine platform, which could allow clinicians to determine cancer treatments that are most effective for a given patient.

This year finalists were selected through a grueling three-step elimination process, in which participants were judged by a panel of executives from the leading pharmaceutical companies (Bristol-Myers Squibb, GSK, Roche, AstraZeneca), venture capital firms (Takeda Ventures, SR One) and consultancies (McKinsey & Co., Silicon Valley Bank).

Dr. Andrew Sikora, associate professor of otolaryngology and founder of Ovodex, praised the duo’s performance. “While Ovodex did not win the competition, making it to the finals is recognition of the promise and potential of the technology platform, and incredible journey from concept-to-product in a little over one year,” he said.

Pathak and Risteski presented an idea that would dramatically speed up the process of determining effective cancer treatments for specific patients.

“The great problem in cancer treatment is that more than 70 percent of the patients who are receiving standardized care are not responding to the treatment,” said Dr. Pathak. “Only three out of 10 patients see any effect based on the treatments they get, and that happens because of the different types of cancers they have, and also because of the individual genetic makeup.”

Every person facing cancer responds differently to treatment, so researchers have long worked on the concept of personalized medicine by removing a sample of a patient’s tumor and testing the response of these “patient-derived xenografts” (PDX) to different treatment options. Usually this approach is done by implanting the tumor in immunodeficient mice, which can take up to 6 months to obtain treatment results. Ovodex’s technology developed by Pathak has the potential to reduce this time frame to less than a month.

“We have developed a chicken egg-based model for making patient-derived xenografts,” said Pathak. “Using fertilized chicken eggs, we graft the patient’s tumor on the membrane that surrounds and nourishes the developing embryo. Within five to seven days, the tumor grows, and we are then able to expand it across multiple eggs to start testing for personalized medicine applications.”

In the past year, they have been able to grow tumors for seven different cancer types, including certain rare cancer types. In many cases, they have proven that the tumor grown on the egg was similar to the tumors growing inside the patient. They were also able to grow certain tumors that could not be grown in mice, thereby demonstrating the versatility, and efficacy of their method.

“Based on our calculations we should be able to come back to the patient within a month with all of the information about their treatment sensitivities – this is real-time personalized medicine,” said Pathak.

The new research minimizes time and cost. “This approach is rapid and cost-efficient. We don’t need a special animal facility to grow these tumors; with the eggs you can monitor them in a regular lab without any high tech instruments or lab facilities.”

This idea has helped launch their start-up company, Ovodex, whose advisory board includes Michael Lewis, associate professor in the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor and nationally-recognized expert on mouse-based PDX models.

Although they did not win the top prize with OneStart, both Pathak and Risteski plan to continue to expand their work to help better improve cancer treatment, and increase life expectancy under the guidance of Sikora.

Clinical trials are expected to start as soon as January 2017. The group has also started providing technical services for the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine as part of the Patient-Derived Xenografts and Advanced in Vivo Models Core.




Social Posts

profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

The three focus areas of our Prostate #CancerMoonshot: - overcoming treatment resistance - exploring #immunotherapy - understanding the tumor environment Learn more: https://t.co/0ZQCm8tMdR #PCSM #endcancer

10 hours ago
profile_image

Rice University

@RiceUniversity

The @GlasscockSchool's fall course catalog is chock-full of offerings for ever-curious learners, including classes in the humanities and sciences, foreign languages and personal and professional development. https://t.co/A793BrcLfz https://t.co/8a1K8LbHE2

10 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

Last Shasta County Navy Veteran who survived Pearl Harbor attack laid to rest https://t.co/lc5ODzbk9l via @JimSchultz_RS

11 hours ago
profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

One internal medicine resident looks back at a time where a patient helped him realize the balance of overly identifying with patients and complete detachment. https://t.co/7xsFWEhVc4

11 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

Santa Clarita Air Force Veteran Launches Campaign For Web Series To Depict Modern Soldier Life https://t.co/Td0ds3jxue via @KHTSRADIO

12 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

Today’s #VeteranOfTheDay is @USArmy Veteran Stanley Nelson. https://t.co/SHml8yEysj

12 hours ago
profile_image

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

VeteransAffairs

Today’s #VeteranOfTheDay is Army Veteran Stanley Nelson. Stanley served from 1949 to 1952.Stanley, from Otwell, Indiana in Pike County, joined the Army in 1949 and completed training at Fort Knox. He was sent to Japan and in 1950 was assigned to the 8th Engineer Combat Battalion, 1st Calvary in Korea during the Korean War. On February 14, 1951, Stanley was defending the flank of advancing soldiers near Chipyong in modern-day South Korea. He was wounded by small arms fire in the right shoulder, right foot, left leg and left foot. Stanley was left incapacitated and was captured by the enemy.Stanley endured torture and difficult conditions while held prisoner and was left to die. However, American forces discovered him and evacuated him for medical treatment. The lower part of Stanley’s leg was amputated the following month and he recovered at Percy James Army Hospital in Battle Creek, Michigan. He was medically retired on January 31, 1952.Thank you for your service, Stanley!

12 hours ago
profile_image

UTHealth

@UTHealth

Thank you @MBThewoodlands for supporting student scholarships at @MDA_UTHGrad! It also is hosting our next House Calls web chat on sports medicine this Thursday, July 19, at 6:30 p.m. CST at https://t.co/N5UU1Jx4pq. Submit a question for our experts by using #UTHealthHouseCalls.

12 hours ago
profile_image

UTHealth

@UTHealth

RT @abc13houston: The most common sports injuries are strains and sprains, but do you know when you might need to see a doctor? The experts…

12 hours ago
profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

RT @BCMHouston_News: Tune in to @FOX26Houston tomorrow in the 8 am hour to hear @bcmhouston's Dr. El-Serag discuss the recent CDC report on…

13 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

#Cancerpain can be related to the disease and treatment. Hear from Dr. Salahadin Abdi on how patients can find relief. #endcancer https://t.co/snFVjDUjNe

13 hours ago
profile_image

TexasHeartInstitute

@Texas_Heart

RT @HealthyWomen: 10 Sneaky Ways to Get Fruits and Veggies in Your #Diet: https://t.co/wJ9x39147k #health https://t.co/EWktCmct2J

13 hours ago
profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

RT @BCMHouston_News: Certain nail products can cause allergic reactions or irritations. @bcmhouston's Dr. Katta shares what to look out for…

14 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

@ParrotsMatter @TargetedOnc @michaelwangmd Hi, yes we are. Here's a list of current clinical trials: https://t.co/JgHpaIKBbX. Best wishes to you.

14 hours ago
profile_image

Rice University

@RiceUniversity

RT @RiceAthletics: To celebrate #WorldEmojiDay, check out our favorite mascot @SammyTheOwl! 🦉👐 https://t.co/ebIKcsu2Z9

14 hours ago