Research

Rice lab synthesizes cancer-killing compound

Chemist K.C. Nicolaou and team achieve first total synthesis of shishijimicin A


By Mike Williams | July 13, 2015

Rice University scientists have achieved the total synthesis of a scarce natural marine product that may become a powerful cancer-fighting agent – the molecule shishijimicin A.

A group led by world-renowned Rice chemist K.C. Nicolaou announced the successful synthesis this month in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

The complex organic molecule was discovered in a rare sea squirt, Didemnum proliferum, more than a decade ago. Lab tests at the time proved it to be more than 1,000 times as toxic to cancer cells as the anticancer drug taxol (aka paclitaxel), but its scarcity did not provide amounts sufficient for extensive biological studies and clinical trials.

For that, chemists needed to design and develop the many steps required to synthesize the molecule, a specialty for which Nicolaou is well-known. Nicolaou, who joined Rice in 2013, is noted for achieving the first synthesis of taxol as well as the synthesis of the highly cytotoxic compound calicheamicin, which was used in the first antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) for targeted chemotherapy.

Nicolaou said shishijimicin shows just as much potential – and perhaps more – for cancer treatment via “Trojan horse”-style ADCs tuned to target specific types of cancer. “Because it’s so potent, you may only need one or two molecules to get into a cancer cell to do the job,” he said.

Such toxins kill cancer cells by cleaving their DNA or freezing their cytoskeletons to prevent them from replicating, he said.

The path to synthesis took a rapid two years because much of the groundwork had already been set by Nicolaou’s basic work three decades ago in the total synthesis of calicheamicin.

“All the fundamental science for the shishijimicin project was done in the 1990s,” he said. “What we synthesized then was too toxic to be used, but now it has revitalized the whole field because biologists and clinicians can selectively target cancer cells (with ADCs). If we hadn’t done the fundamental science so many years ago, it would have taken us so much longer to come to the same point.”

Nicolaou said his prime concern, in addition to facilitating biology and medicine, is to advance the field of synthetic chemistry. “If we don’t advance it now, we won’t be able to make the complex molecules of the future,” he said. “We have to continue to sharpen the tools of organic synthesis.”

Nicolaou said the next steps for shishijimicin are to streamline its synthesis and add chemical handles so it can be attached to antibodies for delivery to cancer cells. “We’ve established the beachhead with the first total synthesis,” he said. “Now we aim to optimize the process to make it more practical and apply it to synthesize variations of the molecule.”

Then it will be up to partner pharmaceutical companies to develop the compound for eventual clinical trials. They won’t need much, Nicolaou said. “If they have a few hundred milligrams – a fraction of a gram – they can take it to clinical trials, because it’s so potent,” he said. “And now they have hundreds of antibodies selected for different kinds of cancer. My hope is that our molecule will lead to an effective drug for personalized medicine.”

Rice postdoctoral researchers Zhaoyong Lu, James Woods and Te-ik Sohn and graduate student Ruofan Li are co-authors of the paper. Nicolaou is Rice’s Harry C. and Olga K. Wiess Professor of Chemistry.

The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas and the Welch Foundation supported the research.




Social Posts

profile_image

Houston Methodist

@MethodistHosp

@virjiniablog Looking good. Good luck!

2 hours ago

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

VeteransAffairs

If you are in crisis and need to speak with a crisis responder, please call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1.Qualified VA responders are standing by to help 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. www.veteranscrisisline.net/

2 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

If you are in crisis and need to speak with a crisis responder, please call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1.Qualified VA responders are standing by to help 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. https://t.co/AvBkaOZGXF

2 hours ago
profile_image

Houston Methodist

@MethodistHosp

@sfaiz212 Thanks for sharing the info.

2 hours ago
profile_image

Houston Methodist

@MethodistHosp

@GHATSdotORG It was our pleasure.

2 hours ago
profile_image

University of Houston

@UHouston

RT @UHCougarMBK: With his first assist tonight, senior point guard @g_robinson1 now has 100 this season..Joins Derrick Daniels (1988-92)…

6 hours ago
profile_image

University of Houston

@UHouston

RT @UHpres: 18th win by Cougars🏀 today defeating USF. Go Coogs!

6 hours ago
profile_image

University of Houston

@UHouston

RT @UHCougarMBK: GREAT to have Hall of Famers Otis Birdsong and Elvin Hayes cheering for us in Tampa tonight#ForTheCity #GoCoogs https://…

6 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

.@pacificu Optometry alumnus, WWII Vet establishes scholarship for other Veterans https://t.co/uExOZIo7Z5 via @pacificu

6 hours ago
profile_image

Veterans Affairs

@DeptVetAffairs

Dogs provide healing to Veterans living with PTSD https://t.co/Q08f0zaNjD via @newscentermaine

7 hours ago
profile_image

BCMHouston

@bcmhouston

RT @BCMHouston_News: ICYMI: Read @bcmhouston's @PeterHotez thoughts on vaccines and autism via @thehill https://t.co/2ESQGkjzVq

8 hours ago
profile_image

UTHealth

@UTHealth

For Latino Patients, Having A Shared Identity With A Doctor Can Strengthen Trust: https://t.co/ngzZ8xgeNt via @KUT

9 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

RT @KellyKhunt: Starting off our breast cancer session at the *17th Oncology Update: Advances & Controversies is ⁦@MDAndersonNews⁩ Dr. Mari…

9 hours ago
profile_image

MD Anderson Cancer Center

@MDAndersonNews

@andregv07 @PhysRelations @lanierparking Andrea, we understand that you’re frustrated and are working with your patient advocate and the valet to address your concerns. Someone will be in touch; you can also contact your advocate directly about your concerns.

9 hours ago

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

Today’s #VeteranOfTheDay is Army Veteran Bernard Horowitz. Bernard served during World War II from 1943 to 1945.Bernard Horowitz was drafted into the Army in 1943. He had wanted to enlist earlier, but since his other brother was already serving his mom did not want him to serve as well so she would not give him permission. He went to Camp Grant in Illinois where he first did some clerical training. Bernard was then trained to be a medic and learned how to bandage people and care for them on the battlefield. He was then assigned to the battalion headquarters as a battalion clerk. It was his job to be in charge of the rations for all four companies at Camp Grant. Bernard made sure they got all the necessary food and that at the end of training there would be enough food to throw a party for the soldiers. Next, Bernard was transferred to a base in Wisconsin where he was responsible for discharging soldiers. While he was there, he fired a gun for the first time with no training and ended up with a swollen lip from the kick of the gun.Bernard was later assigned to the 553rd Military Police Escort Guard and sent over to Europe. He stopped in England then landed in France a few days after D-Day. One of his jobs was to guard prisoners and take them to bury dead cattle. Bernard also did traffic control when the Allies cut off the Cherbourg Peninsula. At one point, Bernard was on his way to Versailles to watch over prisoners there when he passed by a howitzer company and saw one of his cousins. During his free time, Bernard liked to listen to the radio that his whole squad had chipped in and bought to share. After the war was over, he went to Frankfurt, Germany for occupation duty and was discharged on December 7, 1945, exactly 4 years after the United States had entered the war. When Bernard got home, he attended design school and joined an organization for Jewish Veterans.Thank you for your service, Bernard!

10 hours ago